Inventing the Skateboard

From the Set The Spark of Invention

Compelling narrative nonfiction text presents the story of the skateboard's invention: why there was a need for it, its design and testing, the science behind it, and its lasting impact. Additional features to aid comprehension include a table of contents, fact-filled captions and callouts, infographics, a glossary, sources for further research, a listing of source notes, and an introduction to the author.

Format List Price Your Price Qty
$28.50 $19.95
$45.64 $31.95
  • Roller Skates and Scooters
  • Sidewalk Surfboards
  • Building a Better Board
  • Plastic Wheels
  • Glossary
  • To Learn More
  • Source Notes
  • Index
Interest Level Grade 3 - Grade 6
Reading Level Grade 4
Dewey 688.7
Lexile 550
ATOS Reading Level 3.8
Guided Reading Level R
Language English
Publisher The Child's World, Inc.
Format Reinforced book, Hosted ebook
ISBN 9781634074599, 9781503807013
Copyright 2016, 2016
Number of Pages 24, 24
Dimensions 6.5 x 9, 6.5 x 9
Graphics Full-color photographs, Full-color illustrations

A Review of "The Spark of Invention" in Booklist

In this entry in the Spark of Invention series, kids will learn that the skateboards of today are the product of many people’s efforts over time. Beginning with the crude boards of the 1920s, consisting of little more than a plank with roller skate wheels, the text moves forward to the 1960s. At this time, lifeguard and surfer Larry Stevenson started building better boards that had clay wheels and a rear tail to give skateboarders a smoother ride and more control. A final chapter highlights Frank Nansworthy’s contribution: plastic wheels. Brief, cleanly laid out chapters, photo illustrations of kids and teens rolling down sidewalks or hitting the skate park (plus one skateboard diagram), and a glossary make for a breezy introduction to the evolution of a popular sport.

A Review of "The Spark of Invention" in School Library Journal

These highlights in the history of modern technology offer light doses of names and dates, along with nontechnical descriptions of significant early tweaks or innovations. The volumes take snowboarding from the time it was called ‘snurfing’ through Shaun White’s legendary run in the 2010 Olympics, computers from UNIVAC to the Apple II, and mobile phones from Marty Cooper’s first taunting call to a competitor in 1973 to the introduction of the iPhone in 2007. Despite occasional gaps—Laine skips any mention of how color TV came to be—these titles will help young readers pair a range of common tools and toys with the often obscure men (all men, here) who make them possible.

Author: Christine Zuchora-Walske

Christine Zuchora-Walske studied literature, communications, and publishing at the University of Notre Dame and the University of Denver. She has been writing and editing children's books and articles for more than twenty years. She writes about science, history, and current events. Her books have made the IRA Teacher's Choice list and the NSTA/CBC Outstanding Science Trade Books for Students list. Christine lives in Minneapolis with her husband and two children.